ABSTRACTS - Hands-on Workshops

NOTE: Hands-on Workshop sessions are approximately 1 hour 45 minutes. Workshops take place in Room 115 (computer lab).

All sessions take place in Butler-Carlton Hall on the Missouri S&T campus

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2018

Designing 4S Application Activities to Challenge and Motivate Students

HANDS-ON WORKSHOP

Presenter: Dr. Keeta Holmes - Director of Learning Innovation & Design; University of Missouri-St. Louis

Audience: Higher Education

Time and Location: 12:15 - 2 p.m.; Room 115

Participate in a TBL (Team-Based Learning) format to explore group application activities that encourage group collaboration, problem-solving and critical thinking. We’ll begin with a TBL activity, then analyze the structure, process and essential characteristics of an effective TBL activity. Leave the workshop with an action plan on how you might convert a class session into a TBL exercise that enhances team cohesiveness, student accountability, and meaningful learning.


Visual Pedagogy: Harnessing the Power of Short Videos in Your Classroom

HANDS-ON WORKSHOP

Presenters: 
     Elizabeth Reardon - Professional & Continuing EducationMissouri S&T
     Dr. Dan Reardon - Associate Professor of English & Technical Communication; Missouri S&T
     Victoria Hagni - Instructional Developer; Missouri S&T

Audience: Higher Education

Time and Location: 2:15 - 4:00 p.m.; Room 115

According to research conducted by Pearson-Prentice Hall, 65% of our students are visual learners (Vakos, 2017). While now-traditional visual teaching aids like PowerPoint and Prezi can be effective, instructors may also create short videos that will visually explain concepts. If one picture is worth 1000 words, then a two-minute video might accomplish what would otherwise be a 10-minute lecture. Short videos can therefore open class time for more active student learning through the visual enhancement of concepts. In this workshop, the presenters will discuss ways to create short videos to enhance or replace traditional lectures or too-often overused slide presentations, thus creating more dynamic teaching opportunities.