ABSTRACTS - CERTI Mini-Grant Sessions

NOTE: CERTI Mini-Grant sessions are approximately 15-25 minutes (depending on how much time is allotted for Q&A by each presenter). There are two mini-grant sessions per 1-hour time slot. The CERTI Educational Research Symposium program provides mini-grants to instructors interested in trying new technologies and pedagogical strategies in one or more courses.

All sessions take place in Butler-Carlton Hall on the Missouri S&T campus

FRIDAY, MARCH 17, 2017

Student perceptions of cross-functional interdisciplinary teams for projects

CERTI EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM MINI-GRANT SESSION (15-25 minutes)

Presenters:
     Dr. Li Li Eng - Associate Professor of Business & Information Technology; Missouri S&T
     Dr. Bih-Ru Lea - Associate Professor of Business & Information Technology; Missouri S&T

Tags: cross-functional teams; interdisciplinary project; student engagement; active learning

Audience: Higher Education

Time, Date, and Location: 9:00 - 10:00 a.m., Friday, March 17, BCH 121

We assess student perceptions regarding working in teams across two courses: Managerial Accounting, and Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP). A team of accounting students will be partnered with a team of ERP students. The project will simulate a working environment where members of the accounting department have to work with members of the ERP department. We will conduct pre- and post-surveys to assess student experiences in working in cross-functional interdisciplinary teams.


Student-Centered Dynamic Syllabus Development for Mathematical Programming

CERTI EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM MINI-GRANT SESSION (15-25 minutes)

Presenter: Dr. Dincer Konur - Assistant Professor of Engineering Management & Systems Engineering; Missouri S&T

Tags: syllabus development; distributed learning

Audience: Higher Education 

Time, Date, and Location: 9:00 - 10:00 a.m., Friday, March 17, BCH 121

This study aims to structure methods to develop and evaluate the outcomes of student-centered syllabus development for a mathematical programming course, in which students with diverse backgrounds and learning interests enroll. As teaching all mathematical programming concepts is not possible during one semester, some students might not achieve their learning objectives based on their research needs and interests. This study tries to overcome this by working towards developing a syllabus that cover main learning objectives as well as students' individual learning objectives so that the students can get the most out of the course.